Discussions on the history and historiography of Australia's New England

Monday, March 17, 2008

Histories of Taree and the Manning Valley

This post simply provides a link for future reference to a number of local history books sold by the Manning Valley Historical Society.

Friday, March 14, 2008

History of ABC in Newcastle

The following story on the history of the ABC in Newcastle is drawn from ABC Newcastle as first step in developing a history of the media in New England.

Adrian Jose arrived in Newcastle in late 1930 to set up radio station 2NC for the Australian Broadcasting Company. He had joined joined the broadcasting company just two months before, September 1930, as a record library assistant and announcer-in-training.

ABC Newcastle was Australia's first regional station and went live-to-air for the first time on December 19th 1930. Standing in front of the Newcastle Symphony Orchestra, conductor Mr J. Stanley Hurn raised his baton and launched them into the William Tell Overture. The sounds of the Newcastle Orchestra were carried across the country and into homes in Sydney, Newcastle and Melbourne.

A large audience attended the Newcastle Town Hall to listen to the first broadcast and the Acting Prime Minister, J. E. Fenton, spoke to the Newcastle audience from a Melbourne studio.

This new station is the first to be erected outside the capital cities, as portion of the construction program of the National Broadcasting Service. There is quite a large population within range of 2NC and it is evident that the establishment of the local station will benefit listeners. Listeners may rest assured that everything possible will be done to give satisfactory programmes.

The first broadcast came out of the new studios above a billiard room behind the Old Strand Theatre in Market Square, off Hunter Street Mall. A transmitter at Beresfield was set up and connected the Hunter Street studio by landline. The current transmitter is still located at Beresfield.

The Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate wrote about the broadcast the following day:

Representing an important link in a chain of national broadcasting stations, and a development of considerable importance to the people of the Hunter River District, station 2NC Newcastle went on the air lastnight.

The paper's article about the first broadcast was bordered by advertisements to buy radios:

Read's Radios: Made in Newcastle for Newcastle for good reception. 27 pound 10 shillings complete with speakers, valves and installed in your own home and ready to listen in.

This was a lot of money in prices at the time.

There was no obligation under the national broadcasting scheme for the Australian Broadcasting Company to supply more than one hour a week of local Newcastle content. The local content that was provided consisted of Newcastle news, market reports, church services, and other important Newcastle activities.

In 1932 the Australian Broadcasting Commission took over the operations of the Australian Broadcasting Company.

The first broadcast for the new ABC reached every state in the federation and was opened by Conrad Charlton and the then Prime Minister Joseph Lyons. Opening day programs included the first Children's Session with Bobby Bluegum, the first sports program - "Racing Notes" with W.A. Ferry calling the Randwick races, British Wireless News received by cable from London, weather, stock exchange and shipping news. There was also a talk on goldfish and their care, a slot called "Morning Devotions", music the ABC Women's Association session, which included topics such as commonsense housekeeping and needlecraft.

In the first few years, 2NC would broadcast intermittently in the morning and would often shut down for intervals during the day. At the time, there was no concept of continuous broadcasting.

With the outbreak of World War II, strict censorship was imposed on the ABC and most programs had to be submitted to censors three weeks before broadcast. For the first few months of the war, even weather reports were not broadcast due to the censorship restrictions.

At the end of June 1940, the Department of Information took control of the 7.00pm nightly national news. However, after listeners expressed their preference for independent news presented by the Commission, control of the news was returned to the ABC in September 1940.

Many ABC staff members joined up as the war continued, giving the opportunity for women to become announcers, supervisors, and musicians. The first woman announcer, Margaret Doyle, was appointed in 1940, and by 1942, there were 19 women announcers across Australia. During the war, women also became sound effects officers, technicians and journalists.

On September 1st 1946, there was a shift in ABC broadcasting when the network split into two distinct networks, the ABC Interstate Program and the ABC National Program. The Interstate Program had lighter content while the National network was more serious. Newcastle was the first station outside the capital cities to have two transmitters and Newcastle listeners could choose between 2NA and 2NC.

Regional stations with only one ABC transmitter were provided a mix of both National and Interstate programming. But the Newcastle and Hunter residents could tune into 2NA for the light entertainment and 2NC for news and national issues. That later changed with 2NC becoming the frequency for local radio 1233 ABC Newcastle and 2NA the network for Radio National in Newcastle.

Some of the earlier voices on the Newcastle airwaves were Hal Hooker and Hec Scott.

Mr Hec Scott began sports broadcasts directly after World War II and continued doing so for 34 years afterwards. Before that Hal Hooker, who was a former NSW Shield cricketer, was the voice of sport on 2NC, he also took part in the first "synthetic" broadcasts from London in the 1930s.

Hec Scott was most renowned for his rugby league commentaries; he once said his most memorable time as a broadcaster was calling the game where Newcastle team defeated a St George team, which had 11 test players in it. But his experience at 2NC was also diverse, going from sport commentator to emergency broadcaster to acting regional manager.

During the Maitland and Hunter Valley floods in 1955, Hec Scott stayed on air overnight to keep listeners informed. At this time, the ABC Newcastle music record library was limited and the station was trying not to repeat any songs. In the early hours of the morning during the Maitland flood Hec unwittingly played Ole Man River. He immediately began receiving phone calls from listeners in the flooded region complaining about his poor choice of music.

After mostly relying on part-time presenters for the local time slots, it was not until the late 1960's that ABC radio in Newcastle hired its first full-time radio presenter.

Geoff Moore's appointment as presenter at 2NC was the beginning of the stations role as a true local radio station rather than primarily a relay station for Sydney. Soon after there were three full-time presenters at the station including Libby Saunders, Leigh Wallis and Geoff Moore and two part-time announcers, David Patterson and John Clarke. Moya Talty was the first female announcer at 2NC and Marjorie Biggins followed soon after.

At midnight on November 23 1978, most of the AM frequencies across Australia changed to enable the allocation of more broadcast channels. Station 2NC was set at 1233 and 2NA 1512 as they remain there today. Later 2NC was known as the "Hunter's 2NC", then "2NC 1233" as national market research found that radio consumers wanted to identify their station with the frequency. Recently the 2NC has been dropped, the station is now known as 1233 ABC Newcastle.

By 1980 2NC was a lively radio station and a serious news provider with six full-time news journalists on staff and programs filling 92 hours if airtime. The Newcastle Morning Herald praised 2NC on its 50th birthday saying:

It gives its listeners a wide range of programs, ranging from good local news coverage to bright breakfast and drive-time programs to a very popular gardening talkback show.

With the take up of FM stations around the country, 2NC decided to scale back its music content in 1982. The head of the national ABC Radio 1, as it was known then, Arthur Wyndham said:

People who want music will stick to FM and AM stations are more likely to concentrate on developing news, current affairs and information services.

Mr Wyndham described ABC Newcastle as one of the success stories within the national ABC network:

2NC is a good example of the way in which a local ABC radio station with a dedicated, enthusiastic staff can achieve very good results with limited resources

ABC Newcastle has defined itself by providing important local news and information daily but it has also become the destination station during local events or disasters. One of the most memorable events covered by ABC Newcastle was the 1989 earthquake.

Margaret Lewis was presenting the morning program when the earthquake shook Newcastle. Talking about a US Senate Committee at the time, Margaret stopped talking when the earthquake hit, rumbling and studio damage can be heard and soon after transmission was broken. When the transmission was reconnected, it was switched to Sydney briefly, until Newcastle was able to get back on air.

There was much confusion throughout Newcastle and at the station immediately afterward. Margaret Lewis came back on air saying:

We apologise for the interruption to transmission, it appears we've had some sort of explosion and when we find out what the situation is, we certainly will get back to you but at the moment we have quite a few people that are shaking just a little in their shoes.

Soon after, it became clear what caused the shaking. A 5.6 magnitude earthquake hit Newcastle at 10:27am on Thursday the December 28th 1989. Felt as far away as Canberra, the earthquake killed 13 people; nine died at the Newcastle Workers Club, three people were killed in Beaumont Street, Hamilton and one person died of shock. Over 160 people were hospitalised, 300 buildings had to be demolished, and a thousand people were made homeless.

Amid the confusion and power outages, Newcastle turned to 2NC 1233 Newcastle for information. The main instruction was not to re-enter any homes or building, as there was the danger of an aftershock or another earthquake. ABC News was quick to broadcast a special current affairs program two hours after the earthquake hit:

Emergency crews in Newcastle are now accessing the damage inflicted by an earthquake which rocked eastern New South Wales less than two hours ago. First reports say that one person may have been killed and there's been widespread damage to large areas of the City of Newcastle.

Another natural disaster covered by the station was the June long weekend storm and floods in 2007. A severe low-pressure system caused severe storms to hit Newcastle on Friday June 7th and widespread flooding to Newcastle and the Hunter Region throughout the weekend. The storms also battered coal carriers waiting off the Newcastle coastline and the bulk carrier "Pasha Bulker" was grounded on Newcastle's Nobby's beach and remained there until salvage crews were able to refloat her a month later.

The Hunter and Central Coast regions were lashed with severe weather conditions that weekend and the NSW Premier declared it a natural disaster. The storms caused flash flooding, and grounded a bulk carrier the Pasha Bulker on Nobbys Beach. 1233 ABC Newcastle went into emergency broadcasting mode for 72 hours. Listeners sent in photos of the damage, and stories of amazing heroism, survival and courage. The 1233 ABC Newcastle team worked in shift work around the clock to keep listeners, many of who had no power, informed.

For its efforts over the long weekend, the station received a Newcastle City Council Commendation, a State Medal for service and a Walkley Award for its continuous multimedia coverage during the long weekend.

Monday, March 10, 2008

Musings about method and directions

This blog now gets a small but steady stream of hits, so that's progress. Some of the stories have been useful to at least a small number of visitors measured by feedback. Again progress.

To this point I have not worried too much about blog progress in terms of my stated objective: With time, I hope that it will develop into a living history of New England. My feeling has been that if I just keep going, I will ultimately achieve this objective once content gets past a critical minimum point. However, the site is now 16 months old, so it is time to re-assess both objective and progress.

When I used the phrase "living history", I think that I had in mind a history that would evolve and deepen through the act of writing and responding to both my own work and other's inputs. I am less sure about this now. My own knowledge has indeed deepened, but the site still remains too fragmentary to provide any natural coherence.

One particular problem relates to the blog format. This is simply not good for longer, more complex, pieces. I really need to associate the blog with a standard web site. The blog could then be used for discussion, the web site for publishing specific articles, chapters.

A second problem is my reliance on on-line sources. I have little choice here for the present - I have neither access too nor time too access University or archive resources. Yet in using on-line resources I have to be more careful about referencing. People need to be able to check my sources.

I can do something about the reference issue. However, the blog issue continues to worry me, given that I cannot afford to create a web site of the type I would need.

My time is very limited. Every time I try to write a longer thought piece I stall because of time. Further, each time I go in a new direction, I leave other topics sitting at a level still too undeveloped to be of use to others. I do want visitors to find something of use to them on the site, so this is a real problem.

There is no easy solution. I suspect that for each new post I write, I need to put an equivalent time in to updating previous work.

Friday, March 07, 2008

Clarence Valley timeline

The following Clarence Valley time line is from the Clarence Valley Historical Society:

1830 ......... Richard Craig escaped from Moreton Bay Penal colony.
1835 ......... Craig pardoned...told story of the “Big River”.
1838 ......... John Small sailed to the Clarence on board “Susan”.
.................. Cedar-getters arrive on river.
.................. Captain Butcher’s map of river 1838.
1839 ......... Ship building yard and timber business established by Phillips & Cole.
.................. Big River named “Clarence”.
.................. Eatonswill Station established by the Mylne Brothers.
1840 ......... Route from Tablelands made - “Craig’s Line”.
.................. Ramornie Station established by Dr. Dobie.
.................. Post Office opened 1st October - Arthur Price postmaster.
.................. Yulgilbar taken up by Ogilvie.
1841 ......... First store on Grafton side near mouth of Alumny Creek by Bentley.
1842 ......... “Clarence Settler’s Arms” hotel opened near Christopher Creek - Proprietor Durno.
.................. Rev. J. McConnell appointed 1st resident Anglican clergyman - Grafton & Clarence.
1843 ......... First marriage recorded ........... Henry Wall married Bridget Connel?
.................. Baptism of Mary Ann, daughter of Samuel and Arabella Avery.
1844 ......... Birth of George Miller son of Samuel and Arabella Avery.
1847 ......... First Court held at Grafton, 5th April.
................... Court House built on river bank Victoria street.
................... Surveyor, W. W. Darke, surveyed the town of Grafton.
1850 ......... Rev. John Gibson appointed Presbyterian Minister.
1851 ......... First sale of town blocks.
1852 ......... Government assisted school opened - other private schools beforehand.
1854 ......... Anglican Church built in Duke Street.
.................. Five acres granted on river to Grafton Steam Navigation Co.
1856 ......... Grafton School of Arts formed.
................ Arrival of 182 German immigrants in March.
1857.......... First RC church on Nth. Coast opened at South Grafton.
1859 ......... Clarence & Richmond Examiner printed in Grafton June 28th.
.................. First race meeting officially held.
.................. German Club formed.
.................. Grafton proclaimed a Municipality 28th July. J. E. Chapman, mayor.
1860 ......... Volunteer Rifle Corps formed.
.................. First Catholic School opened in Church at South Grafton.
...................Township of Copmanhurst gazetted.
1861 ......... Methodist Church commenced in April - Cnr. Prince and Fry Streets.
.................. Baths built on river bank.
.................. Henry Kendall engaged as solicitor’s clerk in Grafton.
.................. Hand powered punt used for river crossing.
.................. Branch of Ancient Order of Royal Foresters formed.
.................. New Court House opened on Cnr. Duke and Victoria Streets.
1862 ......... Telegraph Station opened.
.................. Grafton Hospital opened.
.................. Father Murphy appointed resident priest.
.................. Clarence River Jockey Club formed in August.
.................. Gaol opened in Victoria Street.
1863 ......... Big disastrous flood recorded.
.................. First harbour works at Clarence Heads.
1864 ......... Branch of Oddfellows Lodge first opened.
1866 ......... Formation of Clarence Pastoral and Agricultural Society.
.................. Foundation Stone of St. Marys laid.
.................. Post Office in South Grafton opened.
.................. Ramornie Meat Works opened - Joseph Page manager.
1867 ......... Bishop Sawyer appointed Anglican Bishop of Grafton.
.................. St. Marys opened.
.................. South Grafton School opened as private school.
1868 ......... Bishop Sawyer drowned.
.................. First steam punt at Dobie St. was commissioned.
.................. Catholic School opened in Grafton.
1869 ......... Earl & Countess of Belmore visited Clarence.
.................. Opened Belmore sugar mill at Ulmarra.
.................. Free Presbyterian church commenced.
.................. Royal Theatre erected in Pound Street.
1870 ......... Solferino Goldfields opened up.
1871 ......... Tannery established cnr. Prince and Hoof Streets.
.................. Grafton Grammar School established by Frederick Newton.
.................. Free Presbyterian church commenced.
.................. Public School Buildings opend Cnr. Queen and Bacon Streets.
1872 ......... Clarence and New England Railway League formed.
1874 ......... Foundation stone of Cathedral laid.
.................. Grafton Argus Newspaper established.
.................. Council adopts a ‘Tree Planting Policy’.
.................. Post Office foundation stone laid.
.................. Bawden Bridge opened April.
1875 ......... Lutheran Church established.
1876 ......... Memorial Park at Boulevarde dedicated.
.................. Lutheran Church built cnr. Alice and Oliver Streets.
1878 ......... Grafton Grammar School new building opened in Mary Street.
.................. Post Office building on present site opened
.................. Shares offered in Grafton Gas Lighting Co.
1879 ......... Commercial Bank of Sydney constructed cnr. Prince and Fitzroy Streets.
.................. Volunteer Fire Brigade commenced.
1880 ......... Court House constructed on present site.
1882 ......... Wreck of SS New England.
1884 ......... Christ Church Cathedral dedicated.
.................. Salvation Army commenced.
.................. AMP building constructed by Wm Kinnear.
.................. Arrival of Sisters of Mercy.
1885 ......... Grafton proclaimed a city.
.................. Grafton Volunteer Water Brigade founded.
.................. Baptist Church opened in March.
1886 ......... St. Andrews Presbyterian Church opened.
1888 ......... Fisher Park gazetted.
.................. The Grip newspaper founded by Baptist Clergyman Henry Beecher.
.................. “The Barn” erected on old showground site.
1889 ......... Zietsch’s Cordial Factory commenced.
.................. First milk separator in district demonstrated at Grafton Show.
1890 ......... Largest recorded flood (8.13m) in March.
1891 ......... District Cricket Association formed.
1892 ......... Grafton Dairy Company began operations.
.................. Grafton Cycle Club formed.
1893 ......... Gaol opened on present site. ................... Floods in February (7.95m) & June (7.45m)
1894 ......... Aruma Benevolent Home opened.
1897 ......... South Grafton Municipal Council formed.
.................. Town Hall & Council Chambers erected in Prince Street.
.................. “Examiner” business moved to School of Arts Hall Prince Street.
1899 ......... McKittrick Park dedicated.
.................. Grafton “Clarion” Newspaper established at South Grafton.
1900 ......... Reticulated water supply for laying of dust in Prince Street.
1901 ......... Golf Club formed - course now Westlawn Services Golf course.
.................. Turning of first sod Grafton-Casino Railway.
1902 ......... Experiment Farm established.
1903 ......... Grafton Telephone Exchange opened New Years day.
.................. Carrs Creek School of Arts formed.
.................. First railway line to Grafton opened via Casino and Lismore.
.................. Chess Club formed.
.................. Imperial Hotel erected cnr. Pound and Turf Streets.
1904.......... First Private Hospital opened - Clarence House.
.................. First nurse graduates at Grafton Hospital.
.................. Coldstream Bridge opened.
1906 ......... Showground moved to present site in Prince street.
.................. “The Barn” moved to Showground.
.................. McFarlane Bridge at Maclean opened.
1907 ......... Jacaranda Avenue created.
1909 ......... Clock Tower constructed to commemorate City’s Jubilee.
.................. Fire station built. Weileys Hotel Built.
.................. Bowling Club formed.
.................. Walkers Hotel Built.
1910 ......... Runnymede Hospital opened cnr. Queen and Fitzroy streets
1911 ......... Turning first sod Nymboida water supply September 11.
1912 ......... Grafton High School established.
1913 ......... St. Marys Catholic Church destroyed by fire.
.................. Clarence River Coursing Club formed.
1914 ......... Foundation stone for new St. Marys church laid.
.................. Also of Grafton High School Building.
.................. Catholic Diocese of Grafton created.
1915 ......... Drill Hall constructed.
.................. Upper Clarence Rugby League competition started.
1916 ......... Grafton Council sacked - Raymond Truman administrator.
1917 ......... Scoutmaster Roy Strong appointed.
.................. Returned Soldiers Association formed.
.................. South Grafton Public School - New buildings erected.
1919 ......... Cub Pack formed.
1923 ......... Council granted permission to use Duke of Grafton ‘Coat of Arms’
.................. Ramornie Meatworks closed.
.................. Methodist Church Built.
1924 ......... Scout Hall built.
.................. Girl Guides commenced...Ingrid Olssen as leader.
.................. Train ferry “Swallow” started.
1925 ......... Saraton Theatre opened.
.................. Prince Edward theatre opened.
1926 ......... Ambulance station opened in Market Square.
.................. “Induna” commenced service.
1927 ......... Garden Theatre opened.
.................. Freemasons Hotel rebuilt.
1931 ......... Historical Society formed.
1932 ......... Bridge over Clarence opened.
.................. Formation of Rotary Club.
1933 ......... Radio 2GF commenced.
.................. Clarence River County Council formed.
1934 ......... Sewerage installed in Grafton.
1935 ......... First Jacaranda Festival held.
1936 ......... 3rd St. Patricks Church, South Grafton opened.
.................. Ambulance station opened on present site.
.................. 2NR commenced.
1939 ......... Tech. classes commenced in Shorthand, Typing, Carpentry and Joinery.
.................. Sir Earle Page Prime Minister for 19 days.
.................. Sandmining at Minniewater commenced.
1940 ......... Free Presbyterian Church opened in Fitzroy Street.
1942 ......... Federal Match Co. commenced in Turf Street.
.................. Five American B-25 Bombers lost over Grafton 15th August.
1943 ......... 13 Wolf Cubs drowned.
.................. Base Hospital status granted to Grafton Hospital.
1944 ......... Public Library opened..first free library in Country NSW.
.................. Sailing Club formed.
1946.......... International Rugby League Match Nth. Coast v Great Britain.
1947 ......... Sailing Clubhouse built on river bank.
.................. South Grafton Infants School opened.
1948 ......... Basketball commenced in Drill hall.
.................. Sunderland Flying boat service commenced.
1949 ......... Full-time teachers appointed to Technical college.
1950 ......... Major flood 7.74m. Guide Hall built in Prince Street
1952 ......... Technical College choir formed.
.................. Pelican Players commenced.
.................. Brewery opened.
.................. Koolkhan Power Station opened.
1953 ......... Present golf course opened.
.................. Lions Club inaugurated.
1954 ......... Major flood 7.72m.
.................. Westlawn Infants school opened.
.................. Technical College opened.
.................. Peter’s Creamery opened in October.
1955 ......... Gas exploration bore at racecourse.
1956 ......... Memorial Olympic Pool opened.
1957 ......... Grafton City Council formed after amalgamation with South Grafton.
1958 ......... “Tim the Bream” Ampol Fishing Competition.
1960 ......... New Gwydir highway to Glen Innes opened.
1961 ......... Indoor Hockey played in Drill Hall.
1963 ......... Major flood 7.63m.
.................. Bank of NSW demolished.
1964 ......... South Grafton High School opened.
.................. Opening of South Grafton Baths.
1965.......... St. Aloysius opened February.
.................. Commercial Hotel demolished.
1966 ......... Schaeffer House purchased by Council.
.................. Harwood Bridge opened.
1967 ......... Match factory moved to Southgate Road.
.................. New Coldstream Bridge.
1968 ......... Civic centre opened. Runnymede hospital closed.
1969 ......... Opening of New Saleyards - December.
.................. Grafton Drivein Theatre - opened December.
1970 ......... Grandstand at racecourse burnt down.
.................. State Office Block - opened July.
1971 ......... Present Grafton Public School rebuilt.
.................. Gilwinga Public School opened.
.................. Garden Theatre becomes basketball stadium.
1972 ......... Grafton levee bank completed.
1974 ......... Freemasons Hotel fire.
1975 ......... New police station built on present site.
1976 ......... Peter’s creamery closed down.
1978 ......... Grafton Post Office restored.
1979 ......... Hockey pavillion erected.
.................. Koolkhan Power Station closed.
1981 ......... South Grafton heated pool opened.
1987 ......... Grafton Shopping World opened.
.................. Final Graduation of nurses at Grafton Base Hospital.
1989 ......... Cowper bus crash...20 persons killed.
1991 ......... Sand Based Hockey Field constructed.
1992 ......... Periodic detention centre opened.
1994 ......... Big W opened in May.
1997 ......... Brewery closed in May.
.................. ABC Office and studio moved to Lismore.
.................. Aruma Benevolent Home closed,
2000 ......... Bendigo Bank opened South Grafton.
2001 ......... River rise 7.77m — South levee complete.
.................. Bi-Lo supermarket constructed.
2002 ......... New sailing clubhouse erected on old site.
2004 ......... Water Based Hockey Field constructed.
.................. Park View Hotel destroyed by fire.
.................. Clarence Valley Council formed.
2005 ......... South Grafton Marina built.
.................. Extensions to Shopping World approved.
.................. Weileys Hotel closed.
2006.................. Bunnings Hardware opened South Grafton.
.................. Aldi Supermarket opened Grafton.

Back to Timelines Entry Page

Thursday, March 06, 2008

Welcome to Visitor 1,000

Well, visitor 1,000 finally arived on this blog.

He, she came from the University of New England, Armidale, and searched on the Great Dividing Range. They did not stay, so what I had to say did not help them. Still, it is nice that number 1,000 came from U.N.E.

Wednesday, March 05, 2008

Grafton Steam Navigation Company - entry page

GRAFTON STEAM NAVIGATION Company was formed on January 24th 1857, consisting of a group of Gentlemen with vested interests in the Clarence River area. In name as first Directors, were, Francis Mitchell, Clark Irving and Rober Waterson. The first Auditors were David Jones, who went on to found the famous Sydney retail firm that still bears his name, and a Mr Grant Tindall of the Ramornie Station and Meatworks on the Clarence River.

Note: There appears to be a confusion in names - Grafton Steam Navigation versus Steamship Navigation. I have still to clarify this.

Source

  1. Port Australia

Supporting Posts

  1. Grafton Steam Navigation Company - paddle steamer Grafton
  2. Grafton Steam Navigation Company - William the Fourth

Tuesday, March 04, 2008

Grafton Steam Navigation Company - William the Fourth



Illustration: William the Fourth 1831-1868

WILLIAM THE FOURTH 54 tons. Lbd: 74' x 15'6" x 7'. Wooden paddle steamer, 2 masts built by Marshall & Lowe on the Williams River at Clarencetown New South Wales. Of passenger capacity. Engine manufactured by Fawcett of Liverpool England. First owner J H Grose of Sydney. Was the first ocean going steamship built in Australia in 1831. June 1839 owned by Brisbane Water Steam Packet Co. September 1839 of General Steam Navigation Co. 1842 of Edye Manning & others. November 1843 of James Byrnes, Parramatta. February 1844 of John Dobbie & D Bloxome (possibly trustees of for the Twofold Bay Pastoral Co). October 1850 of William M Manning & A B Spark. 1853 lengthened to be 77 tons and Lbd: 86' x 14'8" x 8'2". 1857 of the Grafton Steam Navigation Co. June 1858 (supposedly) owned outright by W M & Edye Manning. February 1860 of the Illawarra Steam Navigation Co. 1863 saw sent sent abroad to China where she was puchased in 1864, and operated by A Ellissen & Co., on the Shanghai - Ningpo route. Laid up towards end of December 1868 she was despatched to Japan. Records end.

Source

Grafton Steam Navigation Company entry page

Monday, March 03, 2008

Grafton Steam Navigation Company - paddle steamer Grafton



Photo: Grafton 1854-1898

GRAFTON 316 gross tons, 212 net. Lbd: 140'9" x 22'3" x 10'6". Iron paddle steamer of 2 masts brig rigged and built by J Laird, Birkenhead for R S Ross & Partners in 1854. Sold to David Jones & Partners in December 1858. Sold to Clark Irving & Partners (Grafton S N Co) June 1860. March 1866 of Clarence & Richmond River S N Co. August 1874 owned by J E Manning. During 1877 she underwent conversion to be Twin screw, as well as dimension increases of 397 gross tons and 270 net with Lbd: 145'5" x 27'6" x 13'6".December 1877 owned by W R Williams, Wellington New Zealand and then by the Union Steamship Co., of New Zealand where they placed her on the Strahan(Tasmania) - Melbourne run. 1878 deckhouse added. 1879 lengthened to be 173' x 27'3" x 13'6" and 424 gross tons. 1885 tonage bacame 548 gross after more alterations. and 553 gross tons in 1892. June 12th 1898 she struck the 'bar' at Strahan inward bound. She returned to open sea only to discover the loss of some of her propellor blades had had been holed under the boiler. She was taken in tow by the steamer Mahinapua and attempted the entry into Strahan again only to strike the bar again. The tow line parted and she drifted fatally to the shore, becoming a total loss.

Source

Grafton Steam Navigation Company entry page

Sunday, March 02, 2008

Time for a change in direction - transport

While I will continue my research into New England's Aboriginal peoples, fourteen of my last sixteen posts have been on indigenous history.

Now that I have some initial material up, I feel a need for a change in direction, some sea air so to speak. For that reason, I have decided to make the sea - transport and fishing - my core March focus.